Halfway To 70

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It’s my 35th birthday today. I wasn’t planning on posting here but enough people read my Facebook reflection and said that I had to put it on here for all to see. So without further ado…

Birthdays are a funny thing. I see the day (June 29, 2015) posted all over the city, in the subway stations, in emails, on my phone, and I almost want to nudge the stranger next to me and say, “Hey guess what today is?” But today, just like every other day, is just a day to the vast majority of the human race. The me-ocentric significance is only realized by the people who know me, or are friends with me on Facebook. That my birthday, or anyone’s birthday, is great insignificance to the world, makes it that much more special to share the joy of the milestone with the small, fistful of people who do care.

I’m not one for too much foof or yayrahrah but for some reason, this one, 35, halfway to 70, is one I’m taking a moment to bask in. 35! Half my life ago, I thought I was the dog’s nuts, sure of everything in the world and my place in it. It’s high comedy to look back and see how little I knew. Where I thought I’d be at 35 when I was 17? I can’t remember, but I’m sure I thought I’d be an “adult,” with grandiose responsibilities, taking less risks and being a lot more boring.
So it warms me to know that as different as I may be from my half-a-life ago self, I still have a little bit of that crazy, adventurous, rebellious, teen-age kid at the helm from time to time. But no matter how young of spirit I fight to be, the sands of time slide through the hourglass everyday, without me ever knowing how much remains in the top half. So when I do hit a birthday milestone, it’s good to take it all in. Another year alive is another year blessed. And no matter what, from this day forth. I’ve made it to 35, halfway to 70. Old enough to run for president, but still young enough to live a life of youthful curiosity.
And that’s just it. It’s not that I’m thankful for making the exact choices I’ve made, I’m most grateful that I’ve lived at a time, in a country, with the support of those around me, which have allowed me to make ANY choices about which direction I’ve wanted to take my life, for my entire life. No idea was too crazy. No hunch was impossible. No itch couldn’t be scratched.
35 intentional years. What more could I ask for?

Thanks for being a part of my journey. Even if I’ve never met you, your comments and emails have supported me more than you’ll ever know. The older I get, the more I cherish the memories I’ve made (and will continue to make) with the people I love the most. Onward…intentionally and purposely, no matter how much sand is left in the hour glass.Do not regret growing older. It is a privilege denied to  many.

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Life UpdateWhile I’m here, I figure now is a good time to tell you that in principle, I’ve finished my book on the Mongol Rally experience. It’s with my editor right now. The working title is: Borders, Bandits and Baby Wipes: A 10,000 Mile Journey In A Car Unfit For The Task.

I’m hoping to have it in a purchasable state of being by the end of the summer (or so). My online voice won’t be too far behind it. I’m still figuring out how frequently and in which manner it will be, but when I do, you’ll be the first to know.

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